Walking the East Coast

As much as we love sitting on a train watching the countryside whizzing by the window, you can’t beat filling your lungs with fresh air and exploring our great island on foot.

And of course there are beautiful places steeped in history to discover along Britain's east coast - or very close to it. 

So ditch the car, hop on a train and stretch your legs this Easter with an exhilarating walk somewhere you've never been before.

We’d love to hear your favourites too, so get in touch on Instagram and share your photos of your top east coast walks.

Here are just a few of our faves...

Hadrian’s Wall Path

Hop off the train at Newcastle and on the edge of the city you’ll find the start of the Hadrian’s Wall Path. Following the path 84 miles will take you from coast to coast through stunning countryside. Step back in time as you pass Roman forts, or stroll through busy market towns, stopping off for a pint along the way - it's up to you how fast or how far you go.

If you fancy taking on the full route, it will take about a week. But you’ll need to be well prepared with food and water for the less inhabited stretches, as well as a decent pair of walking boots and rainproof clothing.

Nearest station: Newcastle

Length: 84 mile (135 Km) 

Time: 6 or 7 days for the entire trail but you can break it up into smaller circular walks.

Best bits: It’s the only National Trail which goes from coast to coast. The Solway salt marshes are also worth a stop.

Best for: The experienced walker in for a challenge, and history buffs up for a taste of Roman Britain.

Ready to go? See trains to Newcastle.

Yorkshire Wolds Way

Hull is the gateway to the stunning Yorkshire Wolds Way. Take in amazing chalk landscapes, lively towns and ancient villages. Keep your eyes peeled for the local wildlife that calls this beautiful part of the country home, such as hares that scurry along the ground and red kites that soar through the sky overhead. Green hills roll for miles through some of the most tranquil and gentle countryside in England.

The full route divides up into a number of shorter walks or, if you’re up for a challenge, you can walk the whole way which takes about 6 days.

Nearest Station: Hull

Length: 79 mile (127 km) 

Time: 5 or 6 days for the full trail.

Best bits: The wildlife and the rolling chalk hills.

Best for: The distance walker or the Sunday stroller, with a passion for wildlife.

Ready to go? See trains to Hull.

Thames Path

At the start of the line (or end, depending where you live) in London, the Thames Path awaits. It’s a great way to explore the capital and view its surprising abundance of water-based wildlife. Spanning London and the Chilterns, this walk leads you along Old Man Thames from Greenwich to the edge of the Cotswolds. Whichever section you choose, there are loads of sights along the way, such as the London Eye and Houses of Parliament, Hampton Court Palace, and Windsor Great Park, as well as acres of beautiful countryside and wildlife.

If you pick the right day, you’ll be able to treat yourself to some goodies from the many farmers’ markets before enjoying lunch in a lovely riverside pub.

Nearest station: London King’s Cross (take the Tube from there to one of the many Tube stations near the path such as Embankment, Waterloo or London Bridge).

Length: 184 miles

Time: 14 days for the whole route! But you can cover much of London's riverside history in a day.

Best bit: Getting a different view of the city, and exploring the countryside that lies just outside it.

Best for: City slickers looking to escape.

Ready to go? See trains to London.

Water of Leith

The beautiful city of Edinburgh is a great place to walk around, with Holyrood Park and Arthur’s Seat great starting points. But if you want to see another side of the city and tread a little further afield, why not try The Water of Leith walkway? This 12-mile trail starts outside the city in Balerno and follows the waterway through the city out to the historic waterfront of Leith. If you’re lucky, you may even see one of the European otters that call the waterway home before treating yourself to a well-earned meal in one of Leith’s many restaurants and pubs.

Nearest Station: Edinburgh

Length: 12 miles (35 kilometres)

Time: 7 ½ hours

Best bits: Seeing the other side of Edinburgh.

Best for: Urban explorers with an appetite.

Ready to go? See trains to Edinburgh.

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